But as for me and my family, we will serve the LORD  (JOSHUA 24:15)
KLIPSPRINGER
SHARPE'S GRYSBOK
STEENBOK
RED DUIKER
GREY / COMMON DUIKER
Quick Facts

Size
Stand 53 to 58 cm.

Habitat
Rocky locations,
including mountains
and gorges.

Distribution
Southern and
Eastern Africa.

Diet - Herbivores
Klipspringers are
herbivores, eating rock
plants. They never
need to drink, since the
succulents they subsist
on provide them with
enough water to
survive.

Socialisation
Klipspringers are
found most commonly
in pairs, as solitary
individuals or in small
family groups,
although slightly
larger groups may
congregate
temporarily at feeding
sites.

Reproduction
A single lamb is born
at any time of year.
Klipspringers breed
every 16 months.

Gestation
6 months

Life Expectancy
There are no known
records of life
expectancy in the
wild. They live up to
17 years in captivity.
Predators

 Baboons and large
birds of prey
 Leopards
 Hyenas
 Large birds of prey























Name
Sharpe's Grysbok or
Northern Grysbok
[Raphicerus sharpei]
Appearance

Sharpe's Grysbok is
a shy antelope,
which is slightly
smaller than the
Cape Grysbok, and
which has a thick-set
body and a rich
rufous-coloured coat.

It stands 500 mm at
the shoulder and
weighs 8 kg as an
adult.

A mingling of white
and rich rufous hair
on the back and
sides gives this
species a wiry
grizzled appearance.

Only males have
horns, which are
60-100 mm in length.

Diet
Sharpe's Grysbok is
principally a
browser, feeding on
the leaves and
young shoots of
shrubs and bushes.
Sharpe's Grysbok
also feeds on grass
shoots, fruit and
flowers when
available. Cultivated
crops are also taken
at night.

Breeding
Single lambs are
born after a
gestation period of 7
months.














Steenbok
Appearance
Rufous brown to
fawn coat with long,
broad ears.
Measures 520mm at
the shoulders and
weigh 11 Kg. Hind
quarters and
underparts are pure
white. Only rams
have upright,
slender horns
projecting above the
eyes. Conspicuous
black, facial glands
are situated in front
of the large, dark
brown eyes. These
pre-orbital glands
are noticeable in
both sexes.

Diet
This fleet footed
antelope is
exclusively a
browser, and shows
a preference for
forbs. It is generally
highly selective for
green material such
as young leaves,
flowers, fruits and
shoot tips of various
plants. The ability to
exist independently
of free water is
related to its
selective browsing
habits.

Breeding
Breeding season
has not been clearly
defined. All year
round births have
been recorded.
They have a
gestation period of
about 7 months,
after which single
lambs are born.




Appearance
The Red Duiker is
smaller than the
Common Duiker.
Standing, it is
420mm at the
shoulders and has a
mass of 12 Kg. The
upper parts are a
deep chestnut-red
and the lower parts
of the flanks and
under parts are a
pale chestnut
colour. The nape
and throat turn
ash-grey as the
animal ages.

Both sexes carry
short, straight horns.
The horns have
coarse basal rings
and longitudinal
striations, but are
smooth towards the
tips


Diet
Red Duiker forages
on freshly fallen
leaves, fruits and
flowers from forest
canopies. Foraging
occurs mostly during
the early mornings
and late afternoons.

Breeding
Close-up of a red
duiker.Single lambs
are born after a
gestation period of
210 days. Calving
intervals are about
235 days. They are
non-seasonal
breeders. The young
weigh about one
kilogram at birth. A
single offspring is born
and will stay with its
mother for up to about
six to eight months.
Males take no part in
rearing young but
both sexes will
respond to a distress
call from the calf.




Name
Duiker [Sylvicapra
grimmia]

Description
A view of the
common duiker in
the wild.The Duiker
gets its name from
the Afrikaans word
'duiker' which means
to dive, relating to
the animal's habit of
ducking away into
bushes when
danger threatens.
They can live
independently of
water and feed on
leaves, fruit and
seeds. They are one
of the very few
antelope to have
been known to eat
insects and carrion.

Appearance
The common, or
grey, Duiker is a
tiny, shy antelope
with only the males
having short horns.

Adult males stand
500mm at the
shoulders and
females are about
20mm higher. Males
have a mass of
between 15 and 18
kg, females between
16 and 21 kg.

Diet
They browse a wide
range of
broad-leaved forbs,
trees and bushes,
they also eat fruit,
pods and seeds,
roots, bark, flowers,
fungi, caterpillars
and even nestling
birds. In arid areas
wild melons are
eaten for their water
content. They may
be a problem in
crops, orchards,
vineyards and
plantations.
Vital Statistics